Center No : 95921

Assessment

The focus of HND is on practical knowledge; all units are evaluated through continuous assignments and assessments, projects built into the program and tests for authentication of knowledge gained.

Tests and assignments are set up and evaluated by Info Myanmar College within the framework provided by Edexcel. It is done not only to evaluate the Academic skills of the candidates but also incorporate the necessary arrangements to evaluate the ability and achievement of the common skills areas of the students. Common skills are an integral part of Edexcel philosophy.

A variety of different modes of assessment are employed in the modules. All modules adopt the use of both formative and summative assessment. Formative assessment is seen as a vital review point or milestone that can be used to determine how a student is progressing, enabling positive encouragement to be given, or equally the opportunity to realign and redirect the student. Summative approaches are used to determine a student’s final level of achievement and may also offer formative feedback which will be useful within other modules.

The nature of the subject area for the program is predominantly practical. Assessment throughout the program can therefore be expected to ensure a suitable balance between theoretical knowledge and practical work‐place skills. An assessment strategy will be chosen for each module, which is appropriate for testing the achievement of the learning outcomes.

ASSIGNMENT INFORMATIONS

SUBMITTING YOUR ASSIGNMENTS

YOU ARE ALWAYS REQUIRED TO SUBMIT YOUR ASSIGNMENT ACCORDING TO SUBMISSION GUIDELINE AND ASSESSMENT SCHEDULE

It is your responsibility to ensure that you submit assignments on time and at the appropriate place. Remember no work will be accepted without the assignment coversheet provided by us.

It is most important that you fill up your assignment coversheet properly. You should sign to declare the work is your work. Having completed submit it to the office where a member of staff will date stamp and sign both areas of the form and return tear off copy to you.

KEEP THIS RECEIPT, WHICH YOU CAN PRODUCE TO SHOW THAT YOU HAVE SUBMITTED YOUR ASSIGNMENT.

Finally, it hardly needs to be said that it is always, of course, good practice to keep a hard or (backed up) electronic copy of any assignment you submit. Should the assignment you submitted get lost, then you will have the receipt to prove that you handed it in, and a copy to replace what has been lost.

WE WILL NOT ACCEPT ANY EXCUSE AT LAST MINUTE THAT YOUR WORK HAS BEEN DELETED OR AFFECTED ACCIDENTLY DUE TO TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUE.

HOW TO LEARN TO BE SUCCESS

LEARNING STYLE


REMEMBER, YOU DON'T LEARN BY JUST SITTING & LISTENING, YOU ONLY LEARN HOW TO DO SOMETHING BY ACTUALLY DOING IT.

You should participate by making systematic notes. It is strongly advised that you should make notes whatever the form of delivery. If necessary, ASK FOR CLARIFICATION.
This is where you DO IT. You must participate, whether it be problem solving, doing small exercises, practical work at a machine or group work. If you don't understand something, ASK. Those who fail the program are those who can't do the coursework or exams because they did not "do it" in the tutorials.

We strongly advise you to 'manage' your study time carefully. You should clarify your aims, identify your strengths and weaknesses, consider the context in which you will be studying and generate a broad strategy for successfully covering the material and completing this course.

You should take a broad overview of the requirements of any particular module and unit; consider your situation, workload and home responsibilities in the relevant study-period, then develop specific and realistic plans for active study and writing.

You should bear in mind the overall aims that we suggest for each module, but you may also find it useful to formulate more personal and specific objectives for yourself. These will help you to focus your study, assess material and apply ideas.

For example, in relation to the process of studying, you might want to set yourself targets for:

The amount of time within which you will seek to complete a task

The quantity of work you aim to do in a particular week. Progress through the modules and units, bearing in mind your other responsibilities and tasks progress on assignments.

You should plan and monitor what you do, and where necessary, act to improve the process, quantity and quality of your work. You should make decisions about the importance you will attach to tasks, the time you choose to allocate to them, and the sequence in which you will do them.

People learn in different ways. Creativity, the unexpected and discovery have an important part to play in education. We do not expect that all students will approach the business of study in the same way, or in a way we prescribe. We advise and expect you to be able to manage your study and to be disciplined about how you do it.

To help you manage your study time, an individual learning plan has been provided to your tutor. The tutor will follow up the plan time to time.

READING STYLE


When you are faced with any study-task or reading, it is helpful to spend a couple of minutes making notes on what you currently know about the topic, or think about the question. This will bring your own ideas and experience into focus. It could remind you of previous relevant information from the course. It will prepare you to respond critically to what you read and to integrate whatever you learn into your current knowledge and practice.

Brainstorming is sometimes a useful way to start such notes and to ensure that you generate a comprehensive range of points. By this we mean the rapid gathering of ideas, which seem relevant to a particular topic or problem, within a brief time limit and without judgment. You can then reflect on each idea, develop and analysis the material as a whole, and make connections. Brainstorming is a technique you can use on your own, as well as in groups.

There are various styles of reading, which are appropriate for different purposes. For studying in depth, learning and remembering, you should not necessarily start at the beginning and finish at the end of something you plan to read.

First, look briefly at the whole item to see what is there. Look at headings and tables. Read any introduction or introductory paragraphs, any summary, and any concluding section. You will already be developing an understanding of what is said, without any detailed reading. Skim read each section to amplify your understanding. Finally, read the text in detail. Using these styles of reading, you gradually build up your understanding.

People generally seem to find it easier to focus on weaknesses and minus points when they are evaluating propositions, people and projects. However “evaluation” should cover “plus” points and strengths, too.

RESULT OF OUR PROGRAM

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES

At the end of your studies for the HND Applied Computing you should be able to:


Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of underlying facts concepts, principles and theories relating to the field of Computing and its application both in specific case studies and more general contexts.

  • Critically evaluate possible approaches, tools, techniques and solutions to the use of Computing both in specific case studies and more general contexts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to present, evaluate and interpret both qualitative and quantitative data showing an awareness of the key principles involved including the use of graphs and statistics
  • Critically evaluate contemporary developments in Computing and provide a justified interpretation of the likely impact of these technologies both within a specific working environment and in more general contexts

Demonstrate Knowledge and critical understanding of the main methods of enquiry (including recognized literature searching and requirements elicitation techniques) to gather information about IT problems.

Recognize the nature and extent of an information requirement and the need to apply appropriate safeguards.

Apply analytic tools to critically examine the operation of an IT system (or its components) under a variety of conditions, interpret the outputs of the analysis and present results in an accessible and accurate way.

Create models where appropriate for the purpose of comprehension, communication and prediction.

Evaluate critically the appropriateness of different approaches to problem‐solving following analysis of a complex problem and utilize chosen approaches.

Select and apply appropriate practices and tools (based on requirements and practical constraints) to propose satisfactory Computing solutions.

Use skills and knowledge in the planning and management of projects involving the use of Computing and business systems.

Communicate information, ideas and arguments (orally, electronically or in writing) effectively to specialist and non‐specialist audiences.

Document the development, design and testing of Computing solutions in a structured manner.

Apply knowledge and critical understanding of IT in the development of Computing solutions.

Work both independently and as part of a team.

Demonstrate the acquisition of personal and professional qualities and transferable skills and commitment to continuing professional development and lifelong learning.